onetruequeenofwesteros

There are very, very few African-American astrophysics PhDs. That’s for a reason. I was doing something people of my skin color were not supposed to do.

I was stopped and questioned seven times by University police on my way into the physics building,” he explained. “Seven times. Zero times was I stopped going into the gym — and I went to the gym a lot. That says all you need to know about how welcome I felt at Texas.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson, an anomaly in American science

Follow policymic

(via policymic)

the-selfie-of-dorian-gray

gallifreyanconsultingdetective:

dianeraeb:

siriuus:

do action movies know they can have more than one female character

Someone should make an action movie with all girls except for one guy and have no explanation or mention of it in the movie and then pay all of the actors to act surprised like they’d never noticed when they get the inevitable storm of questions. 

This one male must have a shower scene, be saved by the protagonist at least once, and fall in love with a lead female.

african-american-apparel

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.



On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter.

That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.

"Young Adult Publishing and the John Green Effect" (via delicatedad)

When a man succeeds in a devalued (because of its association with women) field, he legitimizes it in popular opinion.

(via survivorsuperhero)

antipelargous

newwavefeminism:

sorayachemaly:

unwinona:

nocakeno:

campdracula5eva:

sorayachemaly:

Even little kids have a wage gap

  • Boys, on average, spend two fewer hours doing household chores per week than girls do (they play two hours more).
  • If they live in households where children are compensated for doing chores, boys make and save more money.
  • A 2009 study conducted by University of Michigan economists found a two-hour gender disparity in responsibilities per week in a study of 3,000 kids.
  • 75 percent of girls had chores, while just 65 percent of boys do
  • This disparity in chores and free time continues into adulthood all over the world. According to the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), men “report spending more time in activities counted as leisure than women. Gender differences in leisure time are wide across OECD countries.”
  • Year after year, studies repeatedly confirm these patterns.
  • The problems women face with unequal pay and housework duties actually start in childhood.
  • The fact that boys’ chores appear to be more profitable makes the childhood chore gap even more disturbing. Turns out, parents tend to value the work that boys do more.
  • Gender stereotypes dictate these patterns.
  • men who grow up with sisters do less housework than their spouses and are also significantly more socially conservative.

Just had to bold that bottom point there because of the amount of misogynists who claim that because they have women in their family, they can’t POSSIBLY be sexist ever.

oh my fucking god

I vividly remember all the families in my church where the grade-school boys were goofing off with toys and the girls were being handed younger babies and turned into babysitters.

Boys got to be boys, but girls had to be Moms.

Really, it ‘s a serious drag that even little girls today could answer #WithoutTheWageGapIWould

Really interesting post to come across while I’m in the middle of writing a lesson (sort of) centered around the wage gap